MURRAY, Ky. — Below is information regarding recent news, notes and accomplishments from Murray State University for the week of April 1–5.

**

The Murray State University Women’s Center hosted a day of workshops organized by Lead Kentucky, a nonprofit dedicated to recruiting and empowering college women to become the next generation of leaders, on March 28 in Alexander Hall.

The event featured discussions led by several women across multiple industries, including author Sarah Stewart Holland, chef and restaurant owner Sara Bradley and Lead Kentucky President Jacqueline Coleman, who offered opening remarks.

“It doesn’t matter if you want to be a veteran, police officer or president, we want all women to become leaders,” Coleman said.

Women’s Center Coordinator Abigail Cox met with student representatives from the Murray State University Student Government Association, Residential College Association, Eloquent Commitment to Helping Our Sisters, HER Campus and the National Society for Leadership and Success in preparation for the event. These student representatives provided feedback on what topics they would like to see included in the workshops.

“I think it is incredibly important that students are involved in the planning of these events,” Cox said. “Getting feedback from students on what types of issues they would like to see addressed was a priority for myself and the Lead Kentucky board.”

Organizer Dr. Miranda Terry, interim chair of the Murray State University Department of Applied Health Sciences, said she strongly supports Lead Kentucky’s mission of diversity and inclusion, ideals strongly held by the University.

“Unfortunately, most organizations are led by all-male administrators,” Terry said. “While progress has been made, this is still the case. We’ve come a long way, but there’s quite a way to go to get not just women, but people of color, in executive roles.”

The Women’s Center will be further supporting collegiate women who would like to pursue leadership development opportunities by sponsoring three Murray State students to attend the two-day Lead Kentucky conference, held in June on the University of Louisville campus.

**

Murray State University alum David Buckingham, ’74, has been appointed as the newest justice of the Kentucky Supreme Court.

Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin appointed the Murray native to represent the First Supreme Court District of Kentucky, filling in for the retired Bill Cunningham, who left his post earlier this year.

“I appreciate the confidence Gov. Bevin has shown in me by appointing me to the Kentucky Supreme Court,” Buckingham said in a news release. “I pledge to the people of Kentucky that I will serve diligently and to the best of my ability.”

Buckingham began his 29-year judicial career in 1982 as a district judge for the 42nd Judicial District. Following that role, he served as a circuit judge for the 42nd Judicial Circuit from 1987–1996. Buckingham served as a Kentucky Court of Appeals judge from 1997–2005 and as the senior judge on the Kentucky Court of Appeals from 2006–2010.

After serving as an appellate judge for 14 years, Buckingham retired in 2011 and returned to private practice. For eight years, he has served as counsel for both the Adams Law Firm and the Murray Independent School District. He has also occasionally assisted and consulted with other attorneys in appeals cases and litigation.

Buckingham will serve until the position is filled after the November 2019 general election.

**

The Murray State Hunter Seat equestrian team reigned supreme during their spring shows at Middle Tennessee State University (MTSU) and University of the South (Sewanee).


Pictured is the Murray State Hunter Seat equestrian team after their performance at regional competition. The Murray State Hunter Seat equestrian team reigned supreme during their spring shows at Middle Tennessee State University (MTSU) and University of the South (Sewanee).

On Feb. 9 and 10, the team earned the reserve champion title at MTSU. Emily Helmick of Saint Charles, Missouri, was named reserve high individual. Riders placing first included Meredith Stine of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania; Grace Fugate of Zionsville, Indiana; Allison Baker of Independence, Kentucky; Claire Ghent of Miramar, Florida; Shannon McGowan of Germantown, Tennessee; Preston Davidson of Dickson, Tennessee; McKenna Debus of Fort Mills, South Carolina, and Emily Helmick.

On March 2 and 3 at the Sewanee show, Helmick was named high individual rider on Sunday earning first place in equitation on the flat and over fences. The team was named high point team for the Sunday show. For the 2018-19 season, Fugate was reserve high point individual and Stine tied for high point individual with a rider from Sewanee. The team finished 4th out of 11 teams for the season, just two points behind Sewanee.

Stine, Fugate, McGowan and Davidson qualified for Zone competition at Auburn University on March 30. The top two riders in each division will qualify to ride at the Intercollegiate Horse Show Association (IHSA) National Competition in Syracuse, New York, in May.

**

Murray State alum John Ford Clayton, ’86, has been named among the finalists for the Montaigne Medal in the Eric Hoffer Book Awards for his debut novel, “Manipulated.”


Murray State alum John Ford Clayton has been named among the finalists for the Montaigne Medal in the Eric Hoffer Book Awards for his debut novel, “Manipulated.”

A prestigious international award that honors the memory of American philosopher Eric Hoffer, the Eric Hoffer Book Award has become one of the largest and most sought-after awards for small, academic and independently-published titles. Presented annually, the Eric Hoffer Book Award was designed to highlight salient writing and celebrate the spirit of independent presses.

Each year, the Eric Hoffer Awards presents the Montaigne Medal to the most thought-provoking books. Awarded in honor of the great French philosopher Michel de Montaigne, who influenced such people as William Shakespeare, René Descartes, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Friedrich Nietzsche, Jean-Jacques Rousseau and Eric Hoffer, the Montaigne Medal recognizes books that illuminate, progress, or redirect thought.

An intense political thriller, “Manipulated” is a taut, timely, seemingly ripped-from-the-headlines tale that unfolds during the 2016 presidential election.

“I enjoyed my years at Murray State so much, my alma mater made a cameo appearance in the book as the host of a presidential debate,” Clayton said.

Kentucky native John Ford Clayton lives in Harriman, Tennessee with his wife Kara, and canine companions Lucy, Ginger and Clyde. He has two grown sons, Ben and Eli, and a daughter-in-law, Christina. John earned a Bachelor of Science in finance from Murray State University and an MBA from the University of Tennessee in Knoxville.

John is active in his East Tennessee community having served on the local boards of the Boys and Girls Club and a federal credit union, on church leadership and creative teams, and on a parks and recreation advisory board. When not writing, John works as a project management consultant supporting Federal project teams in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. For more information on John Ford Clayton, visit johnfordclayton.com.

For additional information on the Eric Hoffer Book Award, visit hofferaward.com.

**

Dr. Marcie Venter, assistant professor of archaeology/anthropology in the Murray State University Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, was recently appointed by Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin to represent institutions of higher education on the Kentucky Native American Heritage Commission, chaired by Tressa Brown of the Kentucky Heritage Council. Venter finishes out the term vacated by Dr. John Bowes of Eastern Kentucky University.


Dr. Marcie Venter, assistant professor of archaeology/anthropology in the Murray State University Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, was recently appointed by Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin to represent institutions of higher education on the Kentucky Native American Heritage Commission.

Venter has conducted and collaborated in heritage research and preservation with descendant communities, such as the Delaware Tribe of Indians (Bartlesville, Oklahoma) since her graduate studies at the University of Kentucky. She continues to be engaged in research, education, and community outreach in Mexico, Jamaica, and the U.S.

“I am honored to have been considered for this leadership position and I look forward to the new opportunities for collaboration that it presents,” Venter said. “There are many challenges that heritage faces today, and it’s important that our college students are aware of what those are, as well as what the best practices are for ensuring that the diverse native community voices are importantly heard, represented, and respected.”

**

Murray State University alumnus Dr. Daniel Guy, ’76, has been named second Vice President of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons’ Board of Directors.

Guy, who earned his Bachelor of Science from the University, specializes in hip and shoulder surgery, as well as sports medicine. He works in private practice at Emory Southern Orthopaedics in LaGrange, Georgia, and is on staff at WellStar/West Georgia Health System.

He earned his Master of Science and medical degree from the University of Louisville before completing his orthopaedic residency at the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio, Texas.

Guy previously served as secretary, chair-elect and chair of the Board of Councilors of the AAOS, where he served on the Academy Board of Directors. Additionally, he served on many Academy committees, project teams and work groups. He is a diplomate of the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery and is a member of the Alpha Omicron Alpha Medical Honor Society. He is past president and board member of the Georgia Orthopaedic Society.

His new role is the first in a four-year term of volunteer service that includes his serving as president of the Academy in 2021-22.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email