MURRAY, Ky. — Below is information regarding recent news, notes and accomplishments from Murray State University for the week of March 11-15.

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Murray State University’s Arthur J. Bauernfeind College of Business was recently recognized by mbacentral.org as one of the top online MBA programs with an emphasis on economic development. The ranking took into account affordability, support services and quality of classes.

“The students, faculty, and staff of the Arthur J. Bauernfeind College of Business are honored to receive this significant ranking,” said Dr. Tim Todd, dean of the Arthur J. Bauernfeind College of Business. “This further affirms both the focus and high quality of the faculty who drive the academic mission, the staff who support this mission and, most importantly, the students who are educated by this mission.”

“The Murray State MBA and economic development faculty work hard to stay up-to-date in their field and to give online students a ‘real world’ experience,” said Dr. Joy Roach Humphreys, assistant dean and director of MBA programs. “The economic development concentration will give students basic knowledge in an introduction to economic development course, before moving into specialized instruction in the areas of methods, finance, and cost/benefit analysis.”

Additional information on the recognition is available at mbacentral.org/top/best-online-economics-mba/. Those interested in learning more about Murray State’s online MBA may visit murraystate.edu/mba.

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More than 150 high school students participated in simulated technology events sponsored by Murray State University and West Kentucky Community and Technical College at the WK&T Technology Park near Mayfield on Feb. 28.

Participating schools in the 2019 “TechMania” included those in Ballard, McCracken, Graves, Marshall, Hickman, Fulton, Carlisle, Crittenden and Trigg counties as well as Paducah Tilghman, Fulton City, Mayfield, and Murray high schools.

John Vos, WKCTC information technology professor, said students were able to build networks based on real-world situations, similar to setting up a small business.

“In each group’s individual scenario, students built computers, connected them to a network, determined the internet protocol addressing scheme, set up a webserver, built a website and configured a server, switches and routers,” Vos said.

Michael Ramage, director of the Center for Telecommunication Systems Management at Murray State, said many regional businesses find it challenging to find enough employees at their needed level of skill and appreciate being able to participate in TechMania.

“Schools see it as an opportunity to show students that technology skills of various kinds are valued work skills here in western Kentucky,” Ramage said.

Partnering organizations through a donation of time, equipment or funding for the event included AT&T; Computer Services, Inc.; CFSB; DEVsource; GEAR UP Grant; ITC3; Kalleo Technologies, Systems Solutions, Inc.; SmartPath Technologies; the Technology of West Kentucky; and West Kentucky Workforce Development­­­­.

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Murray State University sponsors the annual Martin Luther King, Jr. Prayer Breakfast in Paducah, and Dr. S.G. Carthell, executive director of multicultural initiatives, student leadership and inclusive excellence, works closely with pastors in Paducah to organize and plan for the event. Carthell, Murray State President Dr. Bob Jackson and Student Affairs Vice President Dr. Don Robertson thanked Diane Bailey, Latanya Caison, Mary Black, Neffallie Anderson, and Sandy McGwen, who provide their services and spend hours each year cooking for the breakfast. The women also prepare food for many churches and community programs to include repass meals for families that have lost loved ones. Pictured from left to right are LaTanya Caison, Sandy McGwen, Dr. S.G. Carthell, Diane Bailey, Neffallie Anderson and Mary Black.

Murray State University sponsors the annual Martin Luther King, Jr. Prayer Breakfast in Paducah, and Dr. S.G. Carthell, executive director of multicultural initiatives, student leadership and inclusive excellence, works closely with pastors in Paducah to organize and plan for the event.

Carthell, Murray State President Dr. Bob Jackson and Student Affairs Vice President Dr. Don Robertson thanked Diane Bailey, Latanya Caison, Mary Black, Neffallie Anderson, and Sandy McGwen, who provide their services and spend hours each year cooking for the breakfast. The women also prepare food for many churches and community programs to include repass meals for families that have lost loved ones.

To thank them for their dedication and years of service, the women were given certificates of appreciation for their service to the Paducah community and to Murray State University.

“The efforts of these extraordinary women exemplify our core values of leadership and service and contribute to the success of many in the Paducah community,” Carthell said.

Robertson added, “The MLK, Jr. Prayer Breakfast is an important tradition in the Paducah community and the efforts of these outstanding women must be recognized.”

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On February 26th, Linda Shaw with The National Campus Safety Summit presented Chief Herring of the Murray State University Police Department with the Department of the Year Award at their annual event in Las Vegas. Chief Herring also accepted an award on behalf of the co-winners, Murray State’s Center for Adult and Regional Education.

The Murray State University Police Department and Center for Adult and Regional Education were named first in the nation for campus safety initiatives with both University units receiving the 2018 Department of the Year award from Safe Campus.

Safe Campus recognizes outstanding achievement by administrative departments. Both the Police Department and the Center for Adult and Regional Education were nominated based on their efforts and improvements in campus safety. All 4,706 accredited higher-education institutions across the U.S. were eligible for consideration. Both Murray State units were recognized in Las Vegas, Nevada, at the National Campus Safety Summit in February. Murray State University Police Department Chief Jamie Herring accepted the award on behalf of the co-winners.

“After meeting the other nominees for the award and hearing about the quality of their nominations, I was especially proud that Murray State was selected as Department of the Year,” Herring said. “It is just another example of what makes our community so special.”

A collaboration in 2017 between the Murray State Police Department and the Center for Adult and Regional Education led to the development of a centralized communications calendar and updated procedural plan specific to external groups who visit campus for various programs and camps. The collaboration also included senior leadership within the University as well as the establishment of a committee in which multiple campus units were represented to assess and implement these changes.

The Murray State Police Department provides a variety of important services to assist the campus community. These include the Racer Alert emergency communications system and the promotion and use of the LiveSafe app in addition to providing resources for faculty, staff and students — particularly for incoming students through the Great Beginnings new student orientation programs.

The University’s Center for Adult and Regional Education serves the unique needs of adult and non-traditional learners through program offerings and services available on the Murray State campus and regional campus sites in Paducah, Madisonville, Hopkinsville, Henderson and Fort Campbell. The center also coordinates many of Murray State’s summer youth programs, contracted camps and other events that welcome thousands of visitors to campus each year.

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Three students from the Murray State University College of Humanities and Fine Arts presented research at Posters at the Capitol on Feb. 21 in Frankfort, Kentucky. From left to right are Caroline Mikez, Dr. David Pizzo, Chloe Chaplin and Dr. Kathy Callahan at the capitol building in Frankfort, Kentucky, for Posters at the Capitol.

Three students from the Murray State University College of Humanities and Fine Arts presented research at Posters at the Capitol on Feb. 21 in Frankfort, Kentucky.

Chloe Chaplin of Louisville, Kentucky, and Caroline Mikez of Mayfield, Kentucky, represented the Department of History, while Taylor Davis of Madisonville represented the Department of Music.  All three noted how impactful this day was for them.  

“My experience at Posters at the Capitol was such an honor and so humbling,” said Davis. “It was a proud day to be a Racer and most definitely one of the highlights of my collegiate career.”

“My experience at Posters at the Capitol was one of the highlights of my undergraduate career,” Mikez added.

Posters at the Capitol is an opportunity for students to demonstrate the importance of research in education and to help increase awareness and understanding.

“Posters at the Capitol provides students like myself an opportunity to share our research with students and educators from across the state, as well as the chance to explain the importance of undergraduate research to state legislators,” Chaplin said. “The day serves as a culmination of students’ hard work throughout the year and is a great showcase of undergraduate talent.”

Each student also noted the important role that their faculty advisor played in helping them develop their research skills.

“The professors in [the Department of History] are dedicated and work extremely hard to educate and support their students,” said Mikez.  

Davis also noted her support from the Department of Music.  

“Through the constant support and help from my research mentor, Dr. Bradley Almquist, I was able to share my research, something I am so passionate about, with my peers, college administrators, and state legislators,” she said.

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Pictured is an aerial view of the Hancock Biological Station on the shores of Kentucky Lake.

July 22, 1988 marked the beginning of a new era for the scientific study of Kentucky Lake. On that date, three faculty and staff from Murray State University’s Hancock Biological Station boarded a pontoon boat early in the morning and began regular monitoring of one of the largest reservoirs in the eastern United States.

Now, more than 30 years later, this effort will reach a significant landmark with the occurrence of the 600th monitoring cruise in March 2019. During this time, more than 260 faculty, students, and staff from Murray State’s departments of biological sciences, chemistry, and earth and environmental sciences have participated in the Kentucky Lake monitoring program.

Monitoring efforts have focused on measuring long term water quality and biological changes in Kentucky Lake. The resulting data are housed and maintained at the Hancock Biological Station. The data are used by government agencies, university researchers, corporations, and the general public.

Such large data sets are rare but vital for the evaluation of environmental change, including the effects of invasive species such as silver carp and zebra mussels. The biological station’s boats remain central to the monitoring program, but other technology has been incorporated. Satellite imagery of Kentucky Lake has been used throughout the study period and real time, continuous measurements of water temperature, oxygen levels, and other water quality indicators were added over a decade ago.

For access to the real-time data and for more information about the Kentucky Lake monitoring program, visit murraystate.edu/hbs.

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Murray State University faculty and students attended the Kentucky Chapter of The Wildlife Society annual meeting late last month. From left to right are Dr. Andrea Darracq, daughter Satilla Darracq, John Hewlett, Chrisy Soldo, Elliot Clouse, Lizzie Donaldsen, Bri Vance, Nathan Rister, Trace Anderson, Brendan Calhoun, Nicole Creeden, Lee Neighbors, Kiersten Youngquist, Konner Kirkwood, Taylor Conrad, Jordan Tandy, Cara Arrigo, Sam Holst, Brianna Gibbons, Emma Fehlker Campbell and Lauren Hagan.

A group of 21 Murray State students attended the Kentucky Chapter of The Wildlife Society Annual Meeting Feb. 20-22 at Barren River State Resort Park in Lukas, Kentucky. Students presented research conducted at Murray State while making connections with professionals and fellow students.

Sophomore biology major Gage Barnes from Murray, Kentucky, received the Kentucky Chapter of The Wildlife Society Student Development Committee’s student award to help towards his future research assessing the influence of telecommunication towers on osprey nest productivity. Barnes is a member of a lab group led by Dr. Andrea Darracq, an assistant professor in Murray State University’s Department of Biological Sciences.

“The conference was an excellent opportunity for students to connect with wildlife professionals, listen to the research being done here in the state and to learn about how important partnerships are to wildlife conservation and management,” Darracq said.

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