MURRAY, Ky. — Below is information regarding recent news, notes and accomplishments from Murray State University for the week of Dec. 4–8.

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Dr. Kevin Miller, an associate professor of chemistry at Murray State through the Jesse D. Jones College of Science, Engineering and Technology, recently received the Outstanding Professional Member Research Award from the Kentucky Lake section of the American Chemical Society for his outstanding contributions in polymer chemistry and his overall service to the chemistry enterprise.

“I am very honored to receive such an award and am grateful for the recognition that the Kentucky Lake section has bestowed upon me and the students who have put in so much time and effort over the years building our research program,” Miller said.

This distinguished honor was presented to Miller by the chapter Nov. 14 during a meeting at Bethel University in Tennessee. The award committee responsible for selecting Miller consisted of professors from Murray State, Union University and University of Tennessee at Martin.

“This award is especially meaningful in that it comes from peers and colleagues in the region who, like myself, are dedicated to the education and training of undergraduate students,” Miller said.

Additional awards given at the meeting include the Howard Huyck Outstanding High School Chemistry Teacher Award presented to Kathleen Cooper of Lexington High School in Lexington, Tennessee, as well as the Outstanding Undergraduate Student Member Research Award presented to Bailee Barrett from the University of Tennessee at Martin.

Dr. Kevin Miller, an associate professor of chemistry at Murray State through the Jesse D. Jones College of Science, Engineering and Technology, recently received the Outstanding Professional Member Research Award from the Kentucky Lake section of the American Chemical Society for his outstanding contributions in polymer chemistry and his overall service to the chemistry enterprise.
Dr. Kevin Miller, an associate professor of chemistry at Murray State through the Jesse D. Jones College of Science, Engineering and Technology, recently received the Outstanding Professional Member Research Award from the Kentucky Lake section of the American Chemical Society for his outstanding contributions in polymer chemistry and his overall service to the chemistry enterprise.

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Amanda Royer and Sabrina Smith, two students in the nonprofit leadership studies program at Murray State, recently participated in an internship with the Murray-Calloway County Community Foundation.

The Murray-Calloway County Community Foundation is a local nonprofit organization dedicated to improving quality of life in the greater community. It is a resource for information and an outlet for organizations and individuals to create permanent charitable funds that benefit the city of Murray and Calloway County.

During their internship experience, Royer and Smith contributed to several creative projects within the organization and experienced opportunities for personal growth and development.

“The foundation offered me the opportunity to apply the skills I have learned throughout my time in the nonprofit leadership studies program to a real-life organization,” Royer said.

The nonprofit leadership studies program at Murray State, offered through the College of Education and Human Services, prepares students for roles as future leaders in the nonprofit sector by providing background in areas such as leadership, networking, cultural competency, funding, marketing and the promotion of quality practice.

Internships, both with the Murray-Calloway County Community Foundation and others like it, allow for young professionals to continue cultivating their passion for nonprofit work. It is an experience that both Royer and Smith recommend for their fellow students in the nonprofit leadership studies program.

Smith, a senior from Gutson graduating in December, recently accepted a full-time position as district executive for the Lincoln Heritage Council of Boy Scouts of America. Smith credits her Murray State education in nonprofit leadership studies and organizational communication, as well as her internship opportunities, for providing a solid foundation of experience at the beginning of her career. Royer, a senior from Henderson graduating in May, plans to pursue a master’s degree in public policy or public administration following her graduation.

For more information about internship opportunities in the nonprofit leadership studies program, students are encouraged to contact Dr. Peter Weber, program director, at 270-809-3079 or pweber@murraystate.edu.

Amanda Royer (right) and Sabrina Smith (left), two students in the nonprofit leadership studies program at Murray State, recently participated in an internship with the Murray-Calloway County Community Foundation.
Amanda Royer (right) and Sabrina Smith (left), two students in the nonprofit leadership studies program at Murray State, recently participated in an internship with the Murray-Calloway County Community Foundation.

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Dr. Josh Adair, a member of the Murray State faculty, recently published the second edition of an edited collection titled, “Defining Memory: Local Museums and the Construction of History in America’s Changing Communities.”

The collection, published by Rowman & Littlefield and co-edited by Adair, offers readers multiple lenses for viewing and discussing local institutions. New chapters were added for the second edition, including a section that analyzes the ways in which local museums have come to adopt digital technologies and another section that explores the complexities of creating institutions devoted to marginalized histories.

In addition to the new chapters, the second edition updates existing chapters and features expanded discussions on how local museums treat or ignore racial and ethnic diversity.

At Murray State, Adair is an associate professor of English through the College of Humanities and Fine Arts, director of the Racer Writing Center and coordinator for the gender and diversity studies program.

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Three students from the Arthur J. Bauernfeind College of Business at Murray State University have been selected to study abroad in Saint-Étienne, France, at the Emlyon Business School.

Beginning in January 2018, the following Murray State students will begin their studies abroad at the French university: Keaton Johnson, a junior from Owensboro studying finance; Samantha Reattoir, a junior from Geneva, Illinois, studying business administration with a concentration in international business; and Emily Niehaus, a junior from Bruceville, Indiana, studying marketing.

Murray State has been sending students to study abroad in Saint-Étienne since 2013. Emlyon, a university known for its prestigious graduate programs, offers classes in accounting, business, business administration, finance, human resource management, international business, management and marketing. All courses are taught in English.

To fund the education abroad opportunity, students from Murray State pay their regular tuition to their “home” campus (Murray State) and are then able to attend Emlyon as exchange students. The program offers 300- and 400-level classes for a single semester or for a full academic year, the latter of which Reattoir will be pursuing and thereby earning a second degree from the French university’s Centre de Management Commercial et International.

“The Emlyon exchange program is a great opportunity to broaden your horizons by being a part of a very international group of students and being taught by an international faculty,” said Dr. Tim Johnston, professor of marketing and director of the Emlyon program for Murray State. “Classes are in English but with opportunities to learn French.”

In addition to the three students preparing for their upcoming experience at the French institution, two students from Murray State are currently concluding their own time in Saint-Étienne for the fall 2017 term: Andrew Sweeney, a senior studying business administration from Murray, and Nicholas Smith, a senior studying business administration from Memphis, Tennessee, who is in the process of earning a second degree from Emlyon.

Students from Emlyon also visit Murray State as exchange students. Damien Baures, from Emlyon, is currently enrolled in four business courses for the fall 2017 term at Murray State.

“The Emlyon exchange program is ideal for Murray State students who are pursuing a business-related major or minor,” Johnston said. “Participating students have majored in business administration, marketing, accounting, finance and international business as well as political science and public relations.”

Students interested in pursuing education abroad opportunities at the Emlyon Business School are encouraged to meet with Johnston or with Heather Claiborne, an education abroad advisor at Murray State.

“We would be happy to talk with you about your application, scholarships, transferring courses and how the exchange program can fit with your Murray State degree goals,” Claiborne said.

For more information about education abroad opportunities at Murray State, including those at Emlyon, please visit murraystate.edu/educationabroad.

Three Murray State students have been selected to study abroad in Saint-Étienne, France, at the Emlyon Business School. These students include (from left to right) Keaton Johnson, Samantha Reattoir and Emily Niehaus. Photo by Tim Johnston.
Three Murray State students have been selected to study abroad in Saint-Étienne, France, at the Emlyon Business School. These students include (from left to right) Keaton Johnson, Samantha Reattoir and Emily Niehaus. Photo by Tim Johnston.
While studying for a semester abroad at Emlyon Business School in Saint-Étienne, France, Andrew Sweeney (left), a senior studying business administration from Murray, met a fellow pilot and toured the south of France by air. Photo by Andrew Sweeney.
While studying for a semester abroad at Emlyon Business School in Saint-Étienne, France, Andrew Sweeney (left), a senior studying business administration from Murray, met a fellow pilot and toured the south of France by air. Photo by Andrew Sweeney.